The Law, a Shadow of Things to Come

For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect. (Heb. 10:1)

Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ. (Col. 2:17)

The Law, A Shadow of Things to Come

It has been said that the Old Testament is the New Testament concealed and the New Testament is Old Testament revealed. However, many preachers do not understand the relationship between the types and shadows of the Old Testament and their fulfillment in the New Testament (Col. 2:17).

When interpreting and applying Old Testament scriptures many have ignored a very important hermeneutic principle of interpretation. That is:

When interpreting the relationship between the types and shadows of the Old Testament and their fulfillment in the New Testament, we must progress in revelation and knowledge from a revealed truth (the New Testament covenant of Grace) in order to understand a concealed truth (the Old Testament covenant of The Law). Former Vancouver lawyer

 

Think of the Law as the shadow of an object which is cast backward through time. The shadow (in this instance) is the Old Testament typology of the Law of Moses, the Prophets and the Psalms (Lk. 24:44). The object which cast the shadow backward through time is the cross of Jesus Christ, His finished work, and the New Testament of Grace.

In other words, as New Testament believers, we must interpret the types and shadows of the Law from the standpoint of Grace rather than interpret Grace from the standpoint of the Law.

Just because we are first introduced to The Law (the shadow) does not mean that we are to use the Law to interpret Grace (the body casting the shadow) (Col.2:17). Why is this so?

A shadow cannot interpret or give meaning to the object that cast the shadow. However, the object that casts the shadow interprets and gives meaning to the shadow. In this case, the shadow (the Law) is a vague and ambiguous representation of something else (Grace).

No shadow can provide enough detail to reveal all there is to know about the object it represents. All we can expect are hints and clues.

For example, the shadow of a person might not be clear enough to tell if it were a man or a woman, much less whom it is. The shadow of a plane or bird flying would not reveal its type. Even the shadow of a hand and two fingers cast upon the ground may appear to be a rabbit, a dog, or some other creature.

The truth is, until the object that cast the shadow is fully known or revealed, questions will remain. What color, how tall, deep, or wide an object is will remain a mystery until the object itself is in plain view.

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